300 Bloor Street West

Icebergs floating on the waterfront. A curbside fortune teller. Indigenous animal carvings on the TTC. Creativity and imagination are all around us these days, and it’s all thanks to ArtworxTO, a public art initiative from the City of Toronto. Kicking off the city’s new 10-Year Public Art Strategy, ArtworxTO: Toronto’s Year of Public Art 2021-2022…

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Collecdev supports ArtworxTO: Toronto’s Year of Public Art

Icebergs floating on the waterfront. A curbside fortune teller. Indigenous animal carvings on the TTC. Creativity and imagination are all around us these days, and it’s all thanks to ArtworxTO, a public art initiative from the City of Toronto.

Kicking off the city’s new 10-Year Public Art Strategy, ArtworxTO: Toronto’s Year of Public Art 2021-2022 is designed to “celebrate Toronto’s exceptional public art collection and the artists behind it.” This exciting initiative supports artists and both new and existing artwork that reflects Toronto’s diversity and creates more opportunities for the public to engage with free public art in their everyday lives, across the entire city.

It’s in perfect alignment with our pillar of Social Sustainability, a commitment to integrating diverse programmatic elements that stimulate conversation and ensure private and public spaces are designed to enrich society as a whole. It’s why so many Collecdev communities include original art, space to create, and locations near rich cultural hubs. Public art, as a tool for community development, civic engagement, and urban design, is everyone’s responsibility, especially those who play a direct role in shaping city growth. That’s why Collecdev is thrilled to announce our sponsorship of an ArtworxTO installation – the Dupont Street Mural by the prolific street artist Troy Lovegates.

One of the most recent additions is “Generally Speaking,” a brand-new 120-foot mural that can be found in Yorkville, near Cielo Condos. The mural is the first public piece in Canada by NYC-based African American artist Nina Chanel Abney. A self-identified queer woman, Abney’s works often explore themes of race, gender, pop culture, homophobia, and politics, and “Generally Speaking” is no exception. The piece is full of graphic shapes, text, and icons that define an energetic visual language designed to raise awareness about cultural- and gender-based hate, and that urges the viewer to “‘stop’ for a moment of consideration on how we can embark on a communal process of healing through art and intentional contemplation.”

Plan your own route to discover Toronto’s impressive art scene using the city’s interactive artworks map where you can filter by artist, artwork name, type, neighbourhood or city program and set out to discover them all.

As Toronto continues to carve out a name for itself as a global leader in public art, Collecdev will continue to support the endeavours with commissions like the Dupont Street Mural and communities that put residents within easy reach of inspiring works. Join us for the unveiling and be a part of the legacy!

Learn more about Collecdev Communities by registering today.

For a colourful addition to your Instagram feed, follow the artists @troy_lovegates and @ninachanel.

 

Image courtesy of ArtworxTO.

300 Bloor Street West

Nothing says “Canada” more than sitting around a campfire, but for city dwellers, fireside days are usually limited to summer trips up north. Until now. 60 “Urban Campfire” Benches have appeared around Yorkville and along Bloor. Residents and visitors can stop to warm their spirits on the sleek benches that fit seamlessly into the high-end…

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Urban Campfire Benches Bring Warmth & Cheer To Bloor

Nothing says “Canada” more than sitting around a campfire, but for city dwellers, fireside days are usually limited to summer trips up north. Until now.

60 “Urban Campfire” Benches have appeared around Yorkville and along Bloor. Residents and visitors can stop to warm their spirits on the sleek benches that fit seamlessly into the high-end streetscape made up of luxury retailers like Holt Renfrew, Harry Rosen, and Hérmes.

Designed by Mulvey & Banani International Inc. – the team that created the lighting for the CN Tower – and Toronto-based, award-winning, urban design and architecture firm, DTAH, the “Urban Campfire” Benches strike the perfect balance between sophistication and a sense of comfort and ease.

Wood, granite, and stainless steel wrap 270 degrees, creating a cozy circle that mimics an authentic campfire. The benches even appear to flicker and glow thanks to programmable lighting that shines through a series of intricate designs carved into the steel, blazing in shades of orange and red. Fiery hues aren’t the only colours available. The “Urban Campfire” Benches are a permanent fixture on Bloor and the lighting can be programmed with endless colour options to celebrate the holidays, special events, and every season in between.

Camp-lovers and cityphiles alike will find themselves charmed by the Canadiana-inspired fixtures. The only thing missing are the s’mores! But not to worry, the campfires still deliver a delicious treat. For the holiday season, each bench is equipped with a QR code that you can scan for benchside delivery of specialty menu items from local restaurants like Bar Reyna, Cibo, Eataly, and Amal. It’s as close to “glamping” as you can get in the city.

Take a walk across Bloor this month to experience the “Urban Campfire” Benches for yourself. Eat, drink, and be merry, in true Canadian style with a Bloor Street twist.

Image Courtesy of Bloor Yorkville.

300 Bloor Street West

If you’ve spent any time walking through the neighbourhood surrounding 300 Bloor Street West then chances are that you’re already familiar with the work of KPMB. The award-winning, internationally-recognized Canadian architectural practice is responsible for more than half a dozen notable projects within a 1-kilometre radius. Contemporary Collegiate to contemporary Modern – KPMB’s projects are…

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KPMB Defines The Neighbourhood

If you’ve spent any time walking through the neighbourhood surrounding 300 Bloor Street West then chances are that you’re already familiar with the work of KPMB. The award-winning, internationally-recognized Canadian architectural practice is responsible for more than half a dozen notable projects within a 1-kilometre radius. Contemporary Collegiate to contemporary Modern – KPMB’s projects are defined by a deep and diverse response to place and people. The practice is united in their pursuit of community and sustainability, rooted in an essential belief in the power of architecture to have a positive influence on the way we live.

The firm has been repeatedly recognized for architectural excellence and has received over 300 awards, including 16 Governor General’s Medals, Canada’s highest honour. Founding partners, Bruce Kuwabara, Marianne McKenna, and Shirley Blumberg are each recipients of the Order of Canada for their contribution to Canadian culture and society. Read on to discover some of their signature work in the neighbourhood, and what they have in store for 300 Bloor Street West.

University of Toronto St. George Campus | 7-minute walk

As part of a consortium with Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates and Urban Strategies, KPMB developed the winning proposal to transform 20 acres of the University of Toronto’s historic St. George campus into one of the largest landscape infrastructure projects ever proposed in Canada. Principal at University College and Co-chair of Landmark Committee, Donald Ainslie, called the site “one of the crucial landscapes of the country” with a mandate to “make it live up to its history.” The future landscape will include a series of meandering, interwoven, car-free paths and stately columns of oak trees, creating a pedestrian-friendly realm that will reimagine four landmark spaces and redefine the storied university campus for future generations.

Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto | 8-minute walk

The Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto combines international studies with a Canadian point of view. Similarly, KPMB’s expansion of the facilities combines two diverse elements – the existing traditional Romanesque Revival style with distinctively contemporary additions, where glass and steel act as counterpoints to the rough-hewn texture of historic Miramichi sandstone. The overall vision embraces the prime location on Bloor Street West, preserving the historic elevation and creating a prominent portal onto the campus.

The Joseph L. Rotman School of Management Expansion, University of Toronto | 6-minute walk

In 2012 KPMB envisioned an expansion for the Rotman School of Management, a nine-storey, 161,500 square foot LEED-accredited vertical campus that has played a major role in establishing Rotman as the #1 Business School in Canada, as named by Business Insider, QS Global MBA Rankings, and the Financial Times. The innovative campus brings the power of integrated thinking to life, using a central atrium staircase that acts as a catalyst to encourage interaction between students, alumni, and faculty, comprising some of the top business minds in the world.

Home to the Desautels Centre for Integrative Thinking; the Lloyd and Delphine Martin Prosperity Institute; a 400-seat multi-purpose lecture/event hall; a diverse mix of classrooms, conference and multimedia rooms; innovation labs; student lounges; study rooms; offices; and many other research programs and Institutes for Excellence, the expansion creates an environment in which ideas about business strategy and thought leadership for economic prosperity combine in a vibrant global hub.

Park Hyatt | 9-minute walk

Located at the north-west corner of Avenue Road and Bloor, the Park Hyatt reimagines the boutique hotel experience, establishing the historic building as a prime location for cultural and commercial convergence. Mindful of the impressive heritage of the original Park Plaza, a hotel that welcomed generations of Canadian and international authors, opera singers, celebrities, and politicians for over a century, KPMB tapped into the rich memory of the past while anticipating a vibrant future. The renovated Park Hyatt continues the tradition of sophisticated hospitality in 240 hotel rooms; 65 luxury rental residential units; a redesigned lobby, restaurant, and roof-top bar; conference centre and ballroom; and a new 8,000 square foot Stillwater Spa with 13 treatment rooms.

Royal Conservatory TELUS Centre for Performance and Learning, Koerner Hall & Ettore Mazzoleni Hall | 6-minute walk

KPMB’s vision for the award-winning Royal Conservatory helped define a new cultural precinct for Toronto. With a prominent position on Bloor, at the threshold of the University of Toronto’s downtown campus, the breathtaking home for Canada’s premier music and arts educator includes a unique hybrid of a teaching and rehearsal facilities, along with three major performance venues. Once again demonstrating a flair for seamlessly combining historic buildings with contemporary design, KPMB created a glass and steel sky-lit pedestrian court that links the Bloor Street entrance to the lobby and concert hall and provides a dynamic counterpoint to the façades of the heritage buildings. Siting, massing, and articulation were carefully considered to respect the 19th century heritage buildings that have housed the Conservatory since 1962.

The 1,135-seat Michael and Sonja Koerner Concert Hall is the performance heart of the Conservatory, a world-class venue renowned for both its acoustic excellence and its architectural beauty. Its undulating wood ‘veil’ has become an iconic image for the RCM. Just down the hall, the 240-seat Ettore Mazzoleni Hall has been restored to its original splendour, contemporary interventions integrating with the restored shell to create a flexible performance space for voice, solo, and orchestral recitals.

One Bedford | 5-minute walk

A high-end residential development bordering the Annex, One Bedford marks the transition from the heritage neighbourhood to the north, to the retail/institutional area to the south. To create a seamless evolution, KPMB designed a hybrid building form composed of two towers set on an eight-storey limestone-clad base. The north tower, a lower glass building, mediates between the base and the south point-tower, rising above with an exterior expression that echoes the masonry of the Annex neighbourhood.

Gardiner Museum | 9-minute walk

In 2006 KPMB took on the renewal of a small museum for ceramic arts and the façade of the Gardiner Museum was forever changed. The original building, completed in 1983, was stepped back from the street to preserve unobstructed views of an adjacent neoclassical-style limestone façade, and completely reclad in limestone to match new additions. Vertical circulation and below-grade excavation produced a complete reconfiguration of the museum. Working closely with the exhibit designers, KPMB also designed the new exhibition display casework. The Gardiner has expanded its audience and has become a highly sought-after venue for Toronto events.

300 Bloor Street West | 0-minute walk

KPMB has a bold vision for 300 Bloor Street West, a plan that will transform the site into a skillfully designed mixed-use community of retail, offices, residential, and a completely renovated home for Bloor Street United Church. Evident in so many of KPMB heritage projects, the plans for 300 Bloor Street West give due deference to the historic church façade, respecting and engaging the existing masonry structure, while the tower’s minimal form and detailing introduce openness, space, and light. The church will maintain a prominent presence along Bloor, while along Huron Street, the residential lobby will present a lively and inviting gesture to the neighbourhood.

For more details on KPMB visit their website.

Photo Courtesy of KPMB

300 Bloor Street West

Bloor Street is known for many things – luxury retail, the tree-lined paths of Philosopher’s Walk, the beautiful Gothic Revival buildings that dot the campuses at UofT, and a slate of restaurants and cafés loved by gourmands around the city. It’s also a bustling hub of culture with the Bloor Street Culture Corridor stretching one…

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5 Can’t-Miss Cultural Spots Near 300 Bloor Street West

Bloor Street is known for many things – luxury retail, the tree-lined paths of Philosopher’s Walk, the beautiful Gothic Revival buildings that dot the campuses at UofT, and a slate of restaurants and cafés loved by gourmands around the city. It’s also a bustling hub of culture with the Bloor Street Culture Corridor stretching one mile from Bathurst to Bay, home to a dozen permanent world‐class arts organizations and venues.

From your new suite at 300 Bloor Street West you’ll be steps away from the city’s most venerable institutions for music, film, art, and history. Whether your tastes run classic or contemporary, whether you favour Westwood, Wes Anderson, or Wagner, you’ll find something to surprise and delight. Clear your calendar, culture is on the agenda.

Royal Ontario Museum
The Royal Ontario Museum is home to a world-class collection of art objects and natural history specimens from around the world and across the ages. Upcoming exhibits include an immersive and playful exhibition on one of the most adored fictional characters of all time – Winnie-the-Pooh; a look at thousands of years of India’s painted and printed cottons; and photographs from the most prestigious nature photography competition in the world. Have fun exploring the largest museum in Canada.
100 Queens Park | 9-minute walk

Bata Shoe Museum
North America’s world-renowned shoe museum is a veritable treasure trove of shoes and shoe-related artifacts. Explore an unrivalled collection across five floors. Marvel at heels, sneakers, platforms, sandals, and pointe shoes that once belonged to Roger Federer, Elton John, Karen Kain, Marilyn Monroe, Robert Redford, Elizabeth Taylor, Queen Victoria, and Terry Fox.
327 Bloor Street West | 2-minute walk

Hot Docs Ted Rogers Cinema
This historic, century-old cinema was one of the first picture palaces in Toronto and is now home to first-run Canadian and international documentaries year-round. It began its illustrious history as the Madison Theatre, and has since had many names including The Capri, Eden, Bloor Theatre, and the Bloor Hot Docs Cinema. In 2016, following a generous gift from the Rogers Foundation, the cinema was officially named the Hot Docs Ted Rogers Cinema. Today the theatre, conveniently located at Bathurst Subway Station, continues to share the best in documentary programming, including The Great Green Wall, a breathtaking music-filled journey documenting an initiative to restore 8000 km of land across Africa and Ai Weiwei: Yours Truly, where the renowned artist and activist transforms Alcatraz prison into an astonishing act of socially engaged art;
506 Bloor Street West | 9-minute walk

The Royal Conservatory of Music
The Royal Conservatory is one of the largest and most respected music education institutions in the world. It’s also home to Koerner Hall, a dazzling “shoebox-style” venue described by famed concert pianist Lang Lang as “the best acoustic hall in the world.” The space has attracted performers as diverse as Yo-Yo Ma and Meryl Streep, and is renowned for its unparalleled acoustics.
273 Bloor Street West | 6-minute walk

Yorkville Galleries
This may not be one venue per se, but the collection of galleries in Yorkville is certainly a cultural experience not to be missed. From the contemporary Canadian and international art at Mira Godard Gallery, to the fine arts and photography at LUMAS, there are myriad spaces that will inspire. Flip through rare, out of print, and limited-edition Canadian art books at Ingram Gallery. “Score” a great Instagram pic with the sculpture of a Canadian hockey goalie out front of Loch Gallery on Hazelton Avenue.
Yorkville | 11-minute walk

300 Bloor Street West

When Toronto entered Stage 3 of the province’s reopening plan late last month, gyms were among the many businesses finally allowed to reopen their doors, but with mandated capacity limits and physical distancing, plus some places opting to enforce the use of masks, not everyone is rushing to jump back on the treadmill, especially when…

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Take Your Workout Outside In These 5 Neighbourhood Spots

When Toronto entered Stage 3 of the province’s reopening plan late last month, gyms were among the many businesses finally allowed to reopen their doors, but with mandated capacity limits and physical distancing, plus some places opting to enforce the use of masks, not everyone is rushing to jump back on the treadmill, especially when there’s the option to stay outside.
Studies show that exercising al fresco lowers blood pressure, improves your mood, helps with depression, and reduces stress. Plus it’s absolutely free! So while the sun is shining and Mother Nature is cooperating, why not swap your gym time for a little stress-busting outdoors. Here are five perfect spots near 300 Bloor Street West to do just that.

Sprints on Philosopher’s Walk
This scenic footpath runs north-south, from Bloor Street to Hoskin Avenue, carving a path along a ravine landscape that was one a natural waterway, buried during the Industrial Age. Though just 400 metres long, the Walk is a fantastic spot for sprint training or a marathon leg day of never-ending frog leaps, step-ups, and walking lunges. With the architecture of the ROM, the Royal Conservatory of Music, Trinity College, the U of T Faculty of Music, and the U of T Faculty of Law to distract you, you’ll hardly notice the time fly by.

Cross-Training in Huron-Washington Parkette
Two minutes from home you’ll find the Huron-Washington Parkette. Don’t let the primary colours fool you – this is the perfect spot for expert calisthenic (read: bodyweight) training. Work your way from head to toe through a series of pushups, pullups, lunges, plank holds, air squats, burpees, and tricep dips. Use the benches, the playground, the grass. Get creative. Who says kids get to have all the fun?

A Walk Through Queen’s Park
If you want to do good for your mind, body, and soul then call up some friends and head out for an hour of socializing in the sunshine with a walk through neighbouring Queen’s Park. Named in honour of Queen Victoria, the urban park offers myriad ways to crisscross its oval layout. The north end is dominated by a canopy of large trees that provide welcome shade when temperatures rise. The south end is home to the Queen Elizabeth II Rose Gardens. Footpaths radiate in every direction – see how many new paths you can chart without repeating.

Outdoor Running Along the Beltline Trail
Mid- to long-distance runners take note, 300 Bloor Street West is a great home base for your outdoor runs. A 5-kilometre route that cuts across the leafy ravine of the Park Drive Reservation Lands and the forested trails of the Evergreen Brick Works will deliver you to the start of the Beltline Trail and back again in 10k. Another 1.4 kilometres and you’ll be in the heart of Mount Pleasant Cemetery where you have the option to continue along the Kay Gardner Beltline trail to complete 18k before arriving back home.

Bike the Humber Valley Trail
A straight shot across Bloor Street West will take you to Old Mill station where you can descend to the Humber Valley Trail. Head south along a paved route from the Old Mill through parklands and marshy areas until you arrive at the shores of Lake Ontario. Or head north where advanced riders can clock 56 km in total if you cycle the entire route from the Old Mill to Etobicoke and back again.

300 Bloor Street West is the perfect home base to break a sweat in nature, on two wheels or on two feet. Register today and find your new home.

300 Bloor Street West

The term “disruptor” has become omnipresent over the last decade or so, applied to everything from peer-to-peer ridesharing companies that revolutionized urban transportation, to financial technology companies that seek to simplify the way we bank. But the term is equally applicable to less digitally-oriented endeavours, like the redevelopment of 300 Bloor Street West (a forward-looking…

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The MaRS Discovery District, innovation in the neighbourhood

The term “disruptor” has become omnipresent over the last decade or so, applied to everything from peer-to-peer ridesharing companies that revolutionized urban transportation, to financial technology companies that seek to simplify the way we bank. But the term is equally applicable to less digitally-oriented endeavours, like the redevelopment of 300 Bloor Street West (a forward-looking plan to ensure the continued longevity of Bloor Street United Church and promote a modern community) and its neighbour to the south, the MaRS Discovery District.

Located on the southeast corner of University and College, just a short walk from 300 Bloor Street West, the MaRS Discovery District is a hub of industry disruption, “a launchpad for start-ups, a platform for researchers and a home to innovators.” Founded in 2000 by a group of 14 civic leaders with the support of the government, key corporations, and the Univeristy of Toronto, MaRS brings together members of the innovation community to grow the economy and make an impact. And that impact can be felt not only on some ofsociety’s greatest challenges, but on the community surrounding the campus itself.

The MaRS ecosystem, a curated community of entrepreneurs, investors, corporates, academics, and government partners, reaches far and wide, supporting Toronto’s position as a global tech hub and creating thousands of jobs and billions in revenue. The original building opened in 2005. 2016 saw a West Tower expansion, and plans are underway for a new space set to launch in 2021.

Occupying 1.5 million square feet, MaRS is North America’s largest urban innovation hub. More than 120 diverse tenants call this home – a curated mix of startups, global corporates, and leading research labs that form a community addressing some of society’s greatest challenges like the healthcare system, disease, urban infrastructure, clean water, and climate change. It’s a space that unites like-minded individuals looking to generate a collective positive impact on the world, a space that lends innovation and diversity to the neighbourhood, creating a stronger community. And a space that will continue to act as a magnet for the best and brightest, disruptors on a local, national, and global scale.

MaRS Facts & Figures

1,200+ startups in the MaRS ecosystem
12,800+ jobs created by MaRS-supported ventures in 2017
$4.8B capital raised by MaRS-supported companies since 2008
$3.2B revenue generated by MaRS-supported companies since 2008
$11.7B amount contributed to Canadian GDP since 2008

Photo credit: www.marsdd.com

300 Bloor Street West

Development can feel complicated. Between blue prints and zoning applications, sometimes it’s tough to follow along, but this website is designed to inform and educate so that people can be active participants in the process. Today we’re explaining zoning and the Zoning Bylaw Amendment at 300 Bloor Street West. What is Zoning? Every piece of…

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What Is The Zoning Bylaw Amendment?

Development can feel complicated. Between blue prints and zoning applications, sometimes it’s tough to follow along, but this website is designed to inform and educate so that people can be active participants in the process. Today we’re explaining zoning and the Zoning Bylaw Amendment at 300 Bloor Street West.

What is Zoning?

Every piece of land in Toronto is designated for a specific use (e.g. residential, commercial, mixed commercial-residential, institutional, or industrial). This is called zoning.

The Zoning Bylaw

The Zoning Bylaw is the legal document that implements the policies and objectives described in the City’s Official Plan. It regulates what can be built and where. The Bylaw establishes precise development standards for lot size and frontage, building setbacks, the height and built form of structures, the number and dimensions of parking and loading spaces, requirements for open space, etc.

The Zoning Bylaw Amendment

Anyone who wants to use, alter, or develop a piece of property in a way that doesn’t conform with the Zoning Bylaw, must request a Zoning Bylaw Amendment (ZBA) from the City, also known as rezoning. The ZBA is a useful tool because it allows land owners to determine the most appropriate and desirable plan for a specific piece of property, instead of adhering to the more generic guidelines of the Zoning Bylaw.

How does this apply to 300 Bloor Street West?

300 Bloor Street West is currently finalizing a Zoning Bylaw Amendment for the site and preparing a Site Plan Control application.

The details outlined in the ZBA have been greatly influenced by community input via three pre-application meetings and seven working group meetings over 18 months, with representatives of the community, city staff, and the local Councillor.

Why are we applying for a ZBA?

300 Bloor Street West is a complex site – the existing church creates a significant heritage component that we’re committed to incorporating in the new plan. The site sits on top of extensive transit infrastructure, limiting the prospects for below grade excavation and parking. And the current zoning allows for a structure that is 18 metres tall with 3 times the density of the lot area (restricting how large the building can be). These factors create a challenge that requires a unique solution, one that does not sit within the City’s current Zoning Bylaw.

The amendment for 300 Bloor Street West includes a request for additional density and height to allow for the residential tower (at 100.5 metres with an increase amount of buildable square footage equivalent to 7.23 times site density), and a reduction to the number of required car parking spaces on site. These changes have been proposed in conjunction with feedback from the working groups and represent the collaboration and compromise that will make the development a shining example of strong, community-focused design.

The result of the process will be a new site-specific bylaw that will outline the rules for height; setbacks; stepbacks; permitted uses; amount of residential, office, retail and institutional square footage; and parking, at 300 Bloor Street West. It’s a tailored solution that considers the unique requirements and conditions of the site, resulting in a proposal that best serves the community.

300 Bloor Street West

Collaboration is key to the successful completion of any goal, so when we set the goal of reimagining 300 Bloor Street West as part of the fabric of the Annex, adding new opportunities to, live, worship, work, and play in a socially, economically, and environmentally sustainable community, we knew collaboration would be an integral part…

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The Mission Of The 300 BSW Website

Collaboration is key to the successful completion of any goal, so when we set the goal of reimagining 300 Bloor Street West as part of the fabric of the Annex, adding new opportunities to, live, worship, work, and play in a socially, economically, and environmentally sustainable community, we knew collaboration would be an integral part of the process. That’s why we built this website.

This website isn’t designed to sell, it’s designed to act as a hub of information connecting the community, the city, the congregation, and the partners on this innovative project. The rezoning process outlined by the Planning Act and the City of Toronto mandates just one community consultation meeting and one statutory meeting. We don’t think that’s enough.

We believe that all stakeholders, from community residents to congregation members to anyone who interacts with the site, should have the opportunity to give input on how it evolves, and we’ve set up this website as a way for people to stay informed, to review key documents, to join upcoming events, and, most importantly, to enter into the conversation.

We’ve received a variety of comments, both praising the redevelopment and raising concerns, and we’ve taken them all to heart, using them to help refine the site plan. For instance:

  • Following concerns about the height of the building, the tower was reduced from 38 storeys to 29.
  • Following concerns about massing and heritage, a substantial portion of Bloor Street United Church is being retained with a minimal portion of the residential tower cantilevering over the top of church.
  • Following concerns about shadowing and how the new development would fit within the neighbourhood context, the residential tower was moved further south and reoriented to east-west, while tower massing was reduced to improve the pedestrian experience at street level.
  • Following concerns about traffic and parking, parking design shifted from above ground to underground to further reduce height and provide additional space.
  • Following concerns about the ground level experience along Bloor, additional softscape landscaping was integrated and a Privately-Owned Publically Accessible (POPS) midblock connection was introduced to provide convenient access from Huron Street to Paul Martel Park while strengthening a connection to nature and green space.

We’re committed to working together to make this project the best it can be, and to introduce a development that will enhance the existing culture of the Annex, benefiting the community for decades to come. That’s why we created 300bloorstreetwest.com. Thank you for taking part.

Have something to say? Connect with our team and we promise to get back to you as soon as possible

300 Bloor Street West

We think the neighbourood around 300 Bloor Street West is one of the best spots in the city, and it seems we’re in good company. Earlier this summer we welcomed a new neighbour to the block – the Kimpton Saint George. “Toronto is one of the most dynamic cities in the world right now with…

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Welcoming New Neighbour Kimpton Hotel to Bloor Street West

We think the neighbourood around 300 Bloor Street West is one of the best spots in the city, and it seems we’re in good company. Earlier this summer we welcomed a new neighbour to the block – the Kimpton Saint George.

“Toronto is one of the most dynamic cities in the world right now with its own distinct identity and culture, making it a perfect home for Kimpton,” said Ron Vlasic, Vice-President of Kimpton Hotels & Restaurants. “We’re thrilled to be opening the first boutique hotel that embodies the essence of the lively Annex neighbourhood, in the hub of the city’s arts, culture and dining scene.”

The San Francisco-based boutique hotel chain handpicked Bloor Street West as the location for Canada’s only Kimpton outpost (66 other properties are located in 35 cities around the world). According to a press release, the new 188-room hotel (a complete renovation of the old Holiday Inn) is “the kind of social gathering space that will capture the spirit of this chic, dynamic neighborhood.”

Residents at 300 Bloor Street West may notice some parallels in the development approach – Kimpton is recognized as a leader in transforming existing buildings into artfully designed hotels that pay homage to their environment, an ethos that’s informed the design for the new BSUC and 300 Bloor Street West.

At the Saint George that translates into natural materials, rich textures, mid-century-inspired design, eclectic guestrooms inspired by the Annex’s heritage houses, artwork and décor by top Canadian talent, and an exterior that Toronto Life called, “a chic, subtle ode to the Canadian landscape.” The property has also held on to an old neighbourhood favourite, updating the Fox & Fiddle into The Fortunate Fox, a gastropub where travellers, locals, and students will still find their beloved Sunday night karaoke and half-price wine.

The overall atmosphere at Kimpton Saint George is intimate and intriguing, a great addition to Bloor Street West and another dynamic component in this diverse community. In a “city of neighbourhoods,” it’s great to know that Kimpton has chosen ours for their new home.

Image Courtesy of Kimpton Saint George

300 Bloor Street West

Collaboration is more than just a marketing slogan for Collecdev, as evidenced by the latest plans for 300 Bloor Street West. A revised design for the project made its debut at the Toronto Design Review Panel last month, reflecting input from extensive rounds of community and city consultations with key stakeholders including Bloor Street United…

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300 BSW Reveals New Designs

Collaboration is more than just a marketing slogan for Collecdev, as evidenced by the latest plans for 300 Bloor Street West. A revised design for the project made its debut at the Toronto Design Review Panel last month, reflecting input from extensive rounds of community and city consultations with key stakeholders including Bloor Street United Church, Collecdev and Northrop Development, KPMB and ERA Architects, city planning experts, and the community at large.

From the very beginning, the team at 300 Bloor Street West has been clear that their goal is to build a community that is socially, economically, and environmentally sustainable – a community that preserves and integrates existing heritage, and improves quality of life for residents throughout the neighbourhood. It’s not an easy feat, but we are committed to finding solutions that address the complex constraints of the site, and deliver a culturally rich, diverse, and inclusive environment.

What’s changed?
The biggest changes include:

  • A reduction in the height of the building to preserve the view corridor.
  • A shift from above-ground to underground parking, to further reduce height.
  • A revamp of the building design from the original slender profile to a series of stacked modules that maximize space while minimizing height.
  • Introduction of an east-west midblock connection.

What’s the same?
What hasn’t changed is the striking material façade of the building in metal and glass, the preservation of heritage portions of the existing site, and the impressive new church entrance along Bloor Street, designed to welcome people of every faith into the modernized facilities.

Ample office space (including both BSUC offices and leasable units to sustain the church) are still part of the layouts, as is a vibrant café on Bloor. In addition, more than three quarters of the residential units are still planned with two-bedrooms or more, creating a viable urban lifestyle alternative for families who want to stay in the city.

What’s next?
The story doesn’t end here. 300 Bloor Street West presents a unique opportunity to create a welcoming home not only for residents, but for the community. And we’re committed to getting it right.

The Design Review Panel voted 5 to 2 in favour of the new proposal. We’re thrilled with their support, but acknowledge there’s room for improvement. So we’ll take their comments and rise to the challenge, continuing to refine the building design and create something we’re proud to put our name on, for today and for future generations.

Stay tuned for updates as 300 Bloor Street West continues to evolve.